TRAVEL PROGRAM         PHOENIX ACADEMY         TRAINING PROGRAMS         HOME             



FSCI PLAYERS IN COLLEGE

IDENTIFICATION CAMPS

RECRUITMENT EVENTS

ADVICE

MYTHS

RESOURCES

COLLEGE RECRUITMENT HOMEPAGE

  

Myths

Below is a list of common myths regarding the college soccer recruitment process with sources to refute each myth. Sometimes these statements are made to recruit players to a travel soccer club or make money by encouraging unrealistic expectations. Please note that grades are the most important factor in the recruitment process regardless of ability.

This player has a 4 YEAR athletic scholarship

This is not a true statement. The NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete explicitly states that athletic scholarships exist for one year and are renewed at the coach's discretion.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete

This player has a FULL athletic scholarship.

It is rare for a player to receive a full soccer scholarship. When you hear about this, its usually a combination of academic scholarships, grants, and athletic money. Per the NCAA, there are a maximum of 9.9 soccer scholarships available at the NCAA Division 1 and Division 2 schools. Some schools choose to fund less than the maximum. There are no scholarships available at the NCAA Division 3 level.

Look at the roster of any college program and notice there are at least 20-30 players. A player that receives an athletic scholarship will almost certainly receive a partial scholarship. If you are not convinced, think about the odds. With limited scholarships and huge rosters, why would an incoming freshman unproven at the college level receive a full scholarship over a player firmly established at the college level ?

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete

I have a high chance of receiving an athletic scholarship.

The NCAA states that only 2 percent of all high school age athletes receive athletic scholarships. A 2008 New York Times article lists the number of athletes receiving soccer scholarships. There are millions that play youth soccer and only a small percentage play in college. An even smaller percentage receive any soccer scholarship money.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- NCAA Article: How do Athletic Scholarships Work
- New York Times March 2008 Article: Scholarships, Slicing the Pie

Schools are recruiting a player that is not a high school junior or senior.

In soccer, NCAA Division 1 and 2 schools can not send you recruiting material, call you, or meet with you prior to September 1 of your child's junior year. Yes, you may recieve info on camps or questionaires. Yes, you can even call a coach. However, the coaches can not call you, schedule an official visit, or meet with you in person. Hence, they can not recruit you. This is explictly stated in the NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete. NCAA Division 3 schools can recruit prior to September 1 of your child's junior year.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete

Recruitment happens during high school soccer.

Recruitment rarely happens at high school soccer events for a number of reasons. The competition in travel soccer is much higher than high school. College coaches can easily view hundreds of players at travel soccer tournaments.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- Talk to college coaches directly.

Playing on a certain team or club is my best chance to play college soccer.....

Playing on a certain team does not guarentee anything. Players create their own opportunities thru their talent and strong passion for the game. Much of the responsibility is on the player to follow up on opportunties and contact college coaches. Our club assists players but there is no replacement for the player taking a leadership role in the recruitment process. If the player expresses no interest, the college coach will focus their energy on other prospective players since they are literally looking at hundreds of other players.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- Talk to college coaches directly
- The Sports Source: Mens Soccer Guide

This player has a good chance to play college soccer because of their ability........

If you have the ability but struggle academically, your chances are eliminated. Many of our FSCI Phoenix coaches talk to college coaches directly. The grades issue is either the first or second topic of conversation. There is no getting around it. Grades will make or break your opportunity to play in college.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- Talk to college coaches directly

Signing up for every possible camp, summer league, winter league, is my best chance to get a SCHOLARSHIP.....

A recent Wall Street Journal article points out that there is 9 times more academic scholarships than athletic scholarships. This number does not include academic scholarships from private sector sources so the number is obviously much higher. Your best chance of getting a scholarship is to focus on your grades.

Signing up for every posssible camp, winter league, summer league, and clinic for the sole purpose of landing an athletic scholarship is really a waste of money. If you saved all the money spent on these items from 10 years old to high school graduation, you would have accumulated enough money to fund your own scholarship for college.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- Wall Street Journal August 18 2010 Article - More Money Found in Academic Scholarships
- NCAA Article: How do Athletic Scholarships Work

For the best chance to play college soccer, I am going to sign up for college recruiting services, have my child videotaped, etc

College recruiting services exist to make money. They dont hurt but quite frankly, they dont help. They function as an unnecessary middleman. It has been our experience that college coaches would rather scout a player in person than watch a video. There are many subtle parts of the game that you can not see watching video. Furthermore, its been our experience that its best for players to communicate directly with the college coach.

SOURCES REFERENCED:
- Talk to college coaches directly